Starbucks closed 8,000 Stores for Racial Bias Training but was it Enough?

A sign in the window reports that Starbucks or store shut down for a racial predisposition preparation on May 29, 2018, in New York. - Starbucks is shutting in excess of 8,000 stores over the United States Tuesday to lead worker preparing on racial predisposition, a nearly watched practice that spotlights waiting issues of segregation across the country. (Photograph by Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images)

A sign in the window reports that Starbucks or store shut down for a racial predisposition preparation on May 29, 2018, in New York. - Starbucks is shutting in excess of 8,000 stores over the United States Tuesday to lead worker preparing on racial predisposition, a nearly watched practice that spotlights waiting issues of segregation across the country. (Photograph by Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images)

Tuesday (May 9th) Starbucks has closed  8,000 locations to train 175,000 employees on Racial Bias training. This is one of the world’s largest corporation responses to an incident involving racial profiling. Starbucks the Brand took a hit to its image after Philadelphia Starbucks manager called the police after two black men declined a purchase when waiting for a Real Estate Business Associate, in Starbucks.

The debacle sparked protest and turned into the kind of serious issue that would historically damage Starbucks image worldwide. “This isn’t just a Starbucks problem this is an American problem,” says Heather McGhee on a conference call to discuss the training. Starbucks very own Howard Shultz said he was “sick” to his stomach when he saw the arrest videos. “It’s not going to be enough if they just stop here,” says Keba Konte, the founder of Red Coffee, an Oakland California coffee company who has an entire team of diverse employees including people of color, women, people who’ve been imprisoned, etc. The California based coffee Co-founder says he would like to see Starbucks executive and managerial ranks become as diverse as the customers they serve.

CYCLOLORE Magazine